Browse by author's last name:
[A] |  [B] |  [C] |  [D] |  [E] |  [F] |  [G] |  [H] |  [IJ] |  [K] |  [L] |  [M] |  [N] |  [O] |  [P] |  [QR] |  [S] |  [T] |  [UV] |  [W] |  [XYZ]
Return to home page | Email us
[bar]
 

Books by Mount Holyoke
Alumnae and Professors: XYZ

Contest of Faiths: Missionary Women and Pluralism in the American Southwest
By Susan M. Yohn '79
Cornell University Press. 1995.
Reconstructing the interaction between Presbyterian women missionaries in the Southwest and the native Hispanic-Catholic people they set out to "Americanize" between 1867 and 1924, the author reveals how numerous Protestant women reformers shared experiences that contributed to a national dialogue about cultural pluralism.
Susan M. Yohn is assistant professor of history at Hofstra University.

Black Frankenstein: The Making of an American Metaphor
By Elizabeth Young
New York University Press. 2008.
In this book, Young interprets the figure of a black American Frankenstein as it appears throughout nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. culture. She argues that the Frankenstein monster has served as a powerful metaphor in U.S. culture over the last two centuries for both reinforcing racial hierarchy and shaping anti-racist critique.
Elizabeth Young is professor of English and gender studies at MHC, and author of Disarming the Nation: Women's Writing and the American Civil War.

Disarming the Nation: Women's Writing and the American Civil War
By Elizabeth Young
University of Chicago Press. 1999.
American women writers, says the author, have been profoundly influenced by the Civil War and, in turn, their works have contributed powerfully to conceptions of the war and its aftermath. Offering fascinating reassessments of works by white writers, such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Louisa May Alcott and Margaret Mitchell, and African-American writers, including Elizabeth Keckley, Frances Harper and Margaret Walker, Young also highlights lesser-known texts such as memoirs of women who masqueraded as soldiers. Her original analyses of literary and popular culture demonstrate the interdependence of gender with race, sexuality, region and nation.
Elizabeth Young is associate professor of English at Mount Holyoke.

Finding the First T-Rex
By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld '76
Random House. 2008.
Following hand-drawn directions to the badlands of Montana, paleontologist Barnum Brown in 1902 dug up a jawbone edged with six-inch-long teeth. No on ehad ever seen such a monstrous creature before, and soon Brown was on a quest to discover the skeleton of the mystery carnivore.
Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld is the author of numerous science books for young people, including Fossil Fever and The Curse of King Tut's Mummy.

Dinosaur Tracks
By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld '76
Harper Collins. 2007.
Students and MHC alumnae don't have to go far to see where the first dinosaur tracks were discoveredčright in South Hadley in 1802. Dinosaur Tracks takes a fun look at how tracks are preserved in mud, what kinds of dinosaurs roamed the earth millions of years ago, and what the different tracks looked like.
Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld has written numerous children's books on dinosaurs, including Dinosaur Parents, Dinosaur Young. She lives in Berkeley, California.

Wild Lives: A History of People & Animals of the Bronx Zoo
By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld '76
Knopf. 2006.
Kathleen Zoehfeld tells the story of the Bronx Zoo, from its opening in 1899 with two small, bedraggled prairie dogs to its current efforts in conservation and education. Along with information on the zoo, she discusses the ethics of removing animals from their habitats for public display and ongoing threats to the habitats of many species. She presents personal stories, beliefs, and significant individuals in the zoo's history. With engaging animal photos and lively anecdoes, Wild Lives takes readers through a century of zookeeping at one of the most beloved zoos in the world, and shares what zoologoists have learned over the years aobut keeping wild animals.
Kathleen Zoehfeld was an editor of children's books for more than ten years before becoming a full-time writer. She has published more than forty books for children, most of them about animals and natural history. She lives in Berkeley, California.

What Lives in a Shell?
By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld '76; illustrated by Helen K. Davie
HarperCollins Publishers. 1994.
Part of the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series, this book (for preschool- and kindergarten-age children) explains how a shell is a home to many different creatures.
Kathleen Zoehfeld is a writer in Norwalk, Connecticut. Helen K. Davie is an illustrator in San Jose, California.

How Mountains Are Made
By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld '76; illustrated by James Graham Hale
HarperCollins. 1995.
In explaining how mountains are created, this book includes facts such as: a mountain might be thousands of feet high, but it can still grow taller or shorter each year. For ages 5-9.
Kathleen Zoehfeld, a writer and editor of nonfiction children's books, developed a passion for observing, reading and writing about nature while growing up in the Catskill Mountains. She and her family live in Norwalk, Connecticut.

What's Alive?
By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld '76; illustrated by Nadine Bernard Westcott
HarperCollins. 1995.
This book explains what makes something alive and what all living things need to stay healthy. For ages 3-6.
Kathleen Zoehfeld, a writer and editor of nonfiction children's books, developed a passion for observing, reading and writing about nature while growing up in the Catskill Mountains. She and her family live in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Great White Shark: Ruler of the Sea
By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld '76; illustrated by Steven James Petruccio
Smithsonian Institution/Soundprints. 1995.
This book tells the story of White Shark, a two-day-old great white who hunts alone for food in the Pacific Ocean.
Kathleen Zoehfeld, a writer and editor of nonfiction children's books, developed a passion for observing, reading and writing about nature while growing up in the Catskill Mountains. She and her family live in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Dinosaur Parents, Dinosaur Young: Uncovering the Mystery of Dinosaur Families
By Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld '76
Clarion Books. 2001.
This beautifully illustrated book offers an up-close, investigative look at dinosaurs and their families. For many years, scientists didn't think that dinosaurs were good parents. Then it was discovered that Maiasaura covered its nest with vegetation to keep its eggs warm and that Oviraptor sat on its nest just as birds do. Based on this and other new evidence, scientists now believe that many dinosaurs may have cared for their young. Zoehfeld draws from the latest findings to describe how scientists are drawing new conclusions about what life was like for dinosaurs and their young.
A former children's book editor, Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld is the award-winning author of many books for young people on natural history and scientific topics.

Also available by Kathleen Zoehfeld:
Fossil Fever
Winnie the Pooh Storybook Collection
Flicka: The Movie Novel
Amazon Fever
Curse of King Tut's Mummy
Apples, Apples
Shrek the Third: The Junior Novel
Time for School, Pooh
My Very First Winnie the Pooh: More Growing up Stories
Did Dinosaurs Have Feathers?
Ice Age 2: The Movie Novel
Bill Nye the Science Guy's Great Big Book of Tiny Germs
Dolphin's First Day: The Story of a Bottlenose Dolphin
Cactus Cafe: A Story of the Sonoran Desert
Dinosaur Babies
Dinosaur Tracks
Dinosaurs Big and Small
Fall Leaves Change Color
Fawn at Woodland Way
Human Body
Humpback's Springtime Journey
Ladybug at Orchard Avenue
Little Fawn's Summer Day
Manatee Winter
Penguins
Pumpkin Time
Seal Pup Grows up: The Story of a Harbor Seal
Terrible Tyrannosaurs
Water Animals
Toy Story 2: A Read-Aloud Storybook

Sexual Orientation in the Workplace: Gay Men, Lesbians, Bisexuals, and Heterosexuals Working Together
By Amy J. Zuckerman '89 and George Simons
International Partners Press. 1994.
This workbook sensitively addresses the hottest - and often the most controversial - topic in interpersonal relations today. Designed to be read with a pencil or pen in hand, it is ideal for all coworkers and managers in a diversity training setting or for self-directed use.
Amy Zuckerman is a writer, editor, and facilitator of diversity issues. George Simons is an international trainer and consultant on organizational diversity.

Also available by Amy J. Zuckerman:
Working Together: Succeeding in a Multi-Cultural Organization

Feminist Conversations: Fuller, Emerson and the Play of Reading
By Christina Zwarg '72
Cornell University Press. 1995.
In this new account of the relationship between two powerful and distinctive writers, the author recreates a feminist conversation that has gone unheard - the exchange between Margaret Fuller and Ralph Waldo Emerson - and shows how each influenced the other.
Christina Zwarg is associate professor of English at Haverford College.

[bar]
Browse by author's last name:
[A] |  [B] |  [C] |  [D] |  [E] |  [F] |  [G] |  [H] |  [IJ] |  [K] |  [L] |  [M] |  [N] |  [O] |  [P] |  [QR] |  [S] |  [T] |  [UV] |  [W] |  [XYZ]
Return to home page | Email us